Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Go to Google Groups Home   
Web    Images    Groups    News    more 
  Advanced Groups Search
  Preferences    
 Groups  Search result 13 for intelligence dutch 
 Terrorists Profiled • World's most comprehensive open source database • www.world-check.com Sponsored Links 
 Business Intelligence • Protect your valuable market share w/ a robust, agile Cabis BI system • www.cabis.co.uk
 How Smart Are You? • Not enough, if you don't use your emotional intelligence. Learn how. • www.TalentSmart.com
Search Result 13
From: NY-Transfer-News@abbie.blythe.org (NY-Transfer-News@abbie.blythe.org)
Subject: INTelligence #106 - Summary
This is the only article in this thread
View: Original Format
Newsgroups: misc.activism.progressive
Date: 1999/11/13
INTelligence #106 - Summary

Via NY Transfer News Collective * All the News that Doesn't Fit
...............................................................

*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*
  int-free mailing list
*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*

                   SUMMARY VERSION

INTELLIGENCE                                ISSN 1245-2122
N. 106, New Series, 8 November 1999
Every Two to Three Weeks
Next Issue on 29 November 1999
Publishing since 1980

Editor
Olivier Schmidt

TABLE OF CONTENTS, N. 106, 8 November 1999

FRONT PAGE

WORLDWIDE - WAR ON MCCAFFREY & USA "WAR ON DRUGS" p.1

TECHNOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES

"INTELLIGENCE" OVERVIEW OF MEDIA COVERAGE p.2
"BAD PRESS" FOR LIE DETECTORS p.3
NEW INTERNET & WEB TECHNOLOGIES p.4
TRACE DRUGS ON ALMOST ALL BRITISH BANK NOTES p.5
TECHNOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES - Open Source Intelligence. p.6
     DRUGS, TELEPHONES, PROLIFERATION, TERRORISM, CODES, POLICE
     TECH, IMAGERY, FRAUD, MILITARY TECH, BOOKS, ROBOFLY.

PEOPLE

USA - MICHAEL A. SHEEHAN p.7
     - BARRY MCCAFFREY p.8
GREAT BRITAIN - ANDREW REGAN p.9
NORTHERN IRELAND - ED MALONEY p.10
PEOPLE - Open Source Intelligence. p.11
     USA, SAUDI ARABIA.

AGENDA

COMING EVENTS THROUGH 31 DECEMBER 1999 p.12

INTELLIGENCE AROUND THE WORLD

USA - Y2K-MILLENNIUM MADNESS FOR ALL p.13
     - WASHINGTON'S WAVE OF TERRORISM FEAR RECEDES p.14
NORTH AMERICA - Open Source Intelligence. p.15
     CIA, FBI, DOD, NSA, CANADA.
GREAT BRITAIN - MORE LIES & DECEPTION IN CHINOOK CRASH p.16
     - Nerve Gas Investigation Widens. p.17
NORTHERN IRELAND - BLOODY SUNDAY INQUIRY PRELIMINARY
          HEARINGS p.18
IRELAND - SECRET PFP DECISION MAY THREATEN NEUTRALITY p.19
     - POLICE TARGET "REAL" IRA & ARMS CACHES p.20
FRANCE - INTELLIGENCE JOB GUIDE & TRADECRAFT p.21
NETHERLANDS - NEW SURVEILLANCE SERVICE FOR
          ENVIRONMENTALISTS p.22
     - PROBLEMS "ENFORCING" THE INTERNET p.23
WESTERN EUROPE - Open Source Intelligence. p.24
     GREAT BRITAIN, GERMANY.
EASTERN EUROPE - ANYONE CAN HACK THE PENTAGON p.25
     - Open Source Intelligence. p.26
          CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, RUSSIA.
COLOMBIA - Serrano's Men Move In. p.27
ANGOLA - Outing Savimbi and Caging UNITA. p.28
ISRAEL - JOINT INTEL COORDINATION & RESEARCH PROPOSED p.29
MIDDLE EAST - Open Source Intelligence. p.30
     IRAQ, IRAN.
ASIA - Open Source Intelligence. p.31
     INDIA, CHINA, AUSTRALIA.

----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 3

"BAD PRESS" FOR LIE DETECTORS

Under the section, "If you can't sell it, export it",
discredited US polygraph -- lie detector -- technology has
arrived in Europe, greeted in Paris by Indigo Publication's
"Intelligence Newsletter" with "they [lie detector tests] have
won official recognition in Britain". Someone's not doing their
homework. On 24 July, the "Washington Post" headlined,
"Senators Question Polygraph Use - 'Potential Unreliability' of
Test Spurs Drive for FBI, CIA Analysis of Alternatives". In the
wake of allegations of Chinese nuclear espionage, and to
mollify Congress, the US Department of Energy (DOE) was
preparing to give polygraph tests to thousands of nuclear
scientists, but the Senate intelligence committee stated that:
"Polygraphing has been described as a 'useful, if unreliable'
investigative tool," according to the committee's report on the
fiscal 2000 intelligence spending bill. So, sell it to the
Brits ...

On 15 September, the "San Jose Mercury News" headlined,
"Scientists Call Lie Detectors Coercive, Ineffective -
Livermore: At a federal hearing, lab workers call polygraphs a
police-state tool." The scientists compared polygraphs to
fortune-telling, "cold fusion", alien abductions, astrology and
reading tea leaves ... good for export to Great Britain,
perhaps. Pseudoscience, they claimed, a police-state
interrogation technique sure to drive bright young scientists
away from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and straight
to higher-paying jobs in Silicon Valley. On 18 October, the
"Christian Science Monitor" headlined, "Agency Shrinks Plan to
Protect US Secrets - Effort to make scientists at nuclear labs
take a polygraph test is scaled back". Energy Secretary, Bill
Richardson, decided to scale back his plan to give polygraph
tests to as many as 12,000 DOE scientists and contractors as of
January, and, under a new plan, the DOE will test only a few
hundred employees from three main labs.

It would appear convicted pedophiles and sex offenders
polygraph tested in Birmingham, England, by former Chicago
police officer, Dan Sosnowski, senior member of the American
Polygraphic Association (APA), didn't have the same resources
as US Senators or DOE scientists to oppose lie detector use.
They probably also didn't have the necessary intelligence
"trade craft" to "screw up the machine": drink lots of strong
coffee and get raging mad at every easy question asked and
remain as calm as possible for the "hard questions". With a
little training, almost anyone can pass a lie detector test.
That's why Europe doesn't use that gimmick ... but that
shouldn't keep Mr. Sosnowski from exporting his wares to
British police.

----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 8

USA - BARRY MCCAFFREY

Late last month, retired US Army  general, Barry McCaffrey, 56,
director of the White House Office of National Drug Control
Policy, better known as the US "drug tsar", arrived in Western
Europe to "read the gospel" to the pagans and was met with
equally fervent public opposition. He was the youngest four-
star general in the US Army and a former commander in chief of
the US Armed Forces' Southern Command in charge of all of Latin
America. He saw service in Vietnam, the Dominican Republic and
Iraq where he was a major player in Operation Desert Storm. He
has been decorated by the US government and honored by those of
Colombia, Peru, Argentina, Venezuela and France. He taught
national security studies at West Point US Army military
academy and lectured at the El Salvador institute of higher
defense studies, the Guatemalan senior service school and the
Honduras war college. McCaffrey was appointed by President Bill
Clinton in 1996 and is now in charge of a $17.8 billion federal
drug control budget. He had been an adviser to Pres. Clinton on
Latin American internal security policy.

McCaffrey's somewhat categorical statements concerning drugs
have often been contradicted by US and other national
officials. In 1996, he stated: "There is not a single shred of
evidence that shows that smoked marijuana is useful or needed.
This is not science. This is not medicine. This is a cruel
hoax." Based on empirical research, the US National Institute
of Health claimed that "inhaled marijuana has the potential to
improve chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting" and could be
of value to cancer sufferers. In 1997, McCaffrey stated that
"marijuana is a gateway drug". US Department of Health and
Human Resources has published findings proving that "for every
104 people who have used marijuana, there is one regular user
of cocaine and less than one heroin addict."

One of his more controversial claims concerns the Netherlands
and its liberal drug policies of providing needle exchanges for
addicts and sanctioning the sale of cannabis in regulated
cannabis cafes. "The murder rate in Holland is double that in
the United States and the per capita crime rates are much
higher than the United States," he said last year. "That's
drugs." The Dutch ambassador to the US responded that
McCaffrey's claims had "no basis in fact". The figures quoted
by McCaffrey showed that the US had a rate of 8.2 murders per
100,000 population compared with 17.58 in Holland. But he had
included the Dutch "attempted murders" figure when the true
figure was 1.8 per 100,000, less than a quarter of the American
murder rate. McCaffrey didn't mention the fact that the US
heroin addiction rate is about eight times the Dutch rate, thus
disproving that cannabis is a "gateway drug" to heroin
addiction. When he last visited the Netherlands, his figures on
Dutch drug use were publicly corrected in his presence. During
that reception, he mentioned -- off the record -- "Your heroin
addicts sure look in good shape." It could be that the Dutch
are doing something right ... and 60,000 young people aren't
being "warehoused" in prisons for marijuana offenses as in the
US where prisons have now become America's second largest
industry (see the Front Page article above).

----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 14

USA

WASHINGTON'S WAVE OF TERRORISM FEAR RECEDES

On 20 October, counter-terrorism consultants and US officials
told a House Government Reform subcommittee on national
security that the threat of terrorists using "weapons of mass
destruction" against civilians is real but "overstated" by the
media and in popular culture [and by many Washington
politicians]. All agreed that the threat of a catastrophic
"event" involving weapons of mass destruction was unlikely,
though not impossible. Well-known expert, Rand consultant,
Brian Jenkins, stressed the need for public education about
such potential attacks is crucial, warning that "even if a
terrorist attack, involving biological and chemical weapons,
were to kill only a small number of people ... if we do not
communicate well, it could provoke national hysteria." In
short, it's a "media ops" question ... as it has always been.
  ...(cut)...
----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 21

FRANCE

INTELLIGENCE JOB GUIDE & TRADECRAFT

When dealing with intelligence, one learns to look for valuable
information in unexpected places. Thus, few specialists will be
surprised that "Intelligence" has discovered two excellent
books on espionage, one by a publishing company for youth and
the other a "hand-to-hand self-defense" publisher. At Jeunes
Editions, in Levallois-Perret near Paris, writer and
journalist, Frederic Melot (see "Agenda" above), has just come
out with "Les Metiers de la Securite et du Renseignement -
Sapeur-Pompier, Gendarme, Douanier, Detective Prive ..."
("Careers in Security and Intelligence - Firemen, Gendarmes,
Customs Agents, Private Detectives ..., 1999, address list,
index, 192 pp., isbn 2 910934 72 1, FF69). This unpretentious
little book furnishes clear and succinct, but detailed,
descriptions of all French intelligence services and law
enforcement agencies. Their functions and the types of jobs
performed are laid out in a manner to allow young students to
decide which could be interesting career possibilities.
Education and other ways to successfully prepare for employment
are also provided, but future James Bonds are clearly
discouraged. Basics, such as types of agents, types of
intelligence and the intelligence cycle, are described.

Once you get a job as an intelligence agent [in France], you'll
need a copy of Gerard Desmaretz's "Grand Livre de l'Espionnage
- Guide Pratique du Renseignement Clandestiin" ("Big Book of
Espionage - Practical Guide to Secret Intelligence", 1999,
Editions Chiron, Paris, 253 pp., isbn 2 7027 0620 7). The
author is in charge of the reconversion program for members of
the military to jobs in economic intelligence and is a
consultant to the African Agency for Economic and Diplomatic
Relations in Geneva. The book's 13 chapters cover all aspects
of spy "tradecraft" including target penetration, social
graces, network construction, counterfeit documents, disguises,
lock picking, "flaps and seals", bugs, photo surveillance and
codes. The tetx is clean and non-technical, using correct
"inside" terms and obvious "inside" knowledge. This "inside"
information is interspersed with short sidebars of legal texts
defining the strict limits of "information gathering". For
example, Desmaretz gives the correct "inside" terms but does
not mention the secret code-names for different types of
agents, which would be illegal. This is a good basic book on
espionage which would not usually be expected from a company
that, up until now, has publisher only eight "hand-to-hand
combat" books.

----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 22

NETHERLANDS

NEW SURVEILLANCE SERVICE FOR ENVIRONMENTALISTS

According to press reports, the Dutch police is preparing to
set up a central coordination to collect and analyze
information on activists involved in protests against major
infrastructure projects such as the further development of
Schiphol Amsterdam airport, the HSL-lijn high-speed train track
from Amsterdam to Paris, and the new Betuwelijn train link from
Rotterdam to Germany. The new "coordination point", in which
police intelligence and the BVD internal security service are
to combine forces, is referred to as the "Centraalpunt
Informatie Coordinatie Grote Infrastructurele Projecten"
(CICI). All information on activist preparations for protests
are to be collected and analyzed to thwart sabotage and prevent
delays. The Interior Ministry will finance the initiative.
  ...(cut)...
----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 23

NETHERLANDS

PROBLEMS "ENFORCING" THE INTERNET

Tapping Internet communications for law enforcement and
security purposes is now getting off the ground in the
Netherlands. Over the past few months, certain pilot projects,
experimenting with monitoring data traffic, were somewhat
successful. The police and BVD internal security are now ready
to include Internet tapping in their regular "tool kit" of
investigative procedures. The government initially opted for a
"black box" solution in which sealed equipment would be
installed on the premises of the Internet provider. The "black
box" equipment would have been "off limits" to anyone but
police and security service personnel. However, in true Dutch
tradition, local Internet providers refused to cooperate,
claiming that such a secret and uncontrollable arrangement made
it possible for the government to extensively eavesdrop without
a court order. Although investigators dislike running the risk
a provider could inform a monitored person or organization of
the government's interest in their communications, in the end
the services had to agree to a more open solution.
  ...(cut)...
----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 25

EASTERN EUROPE

ANYONE CAN HACK THE PENTAGON

The US Pentagon would do the world a service by listing the
nationalities of all who have hacked a Pentagon Web site.
Remember that during the Gulf War, some Dutch hackers retrieved
information about redeployment of American troops from a US
Department of Defence Web site and tried to sell it to Iraq.
Perhaps with such a list, a reasonable discussion of whether or
not Russian and Ukrainian, formerly the "Evil Empire",
intelligence are "attacking" the US, or is Pentagon Web
security so bad that anyone "Net-literate" can hack the
Pentagon. For the time being, evidence tends to support the
latter explanation, although the former Soviets have "fessed
up" to contributing to "fun and games" on Pentagon sites.
  ...(cut)...
----------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 106, 8 November 1999, p. 31

ASIA - Open Source Intelligence.
  ...(cut)...
AUSTRALIA.  Parliament's Treaties Committee recently stated it
cannot obtain enough information about the purpose or operation
of the secret US satellite intelligence base at Pine Gap, in
the Northern Territory. It was denied full access to the Alice
Springs base, which is officially operated by Australian
intelligence and the CIA when it is in reality a NSA base.
Describing the standoff as "untenable", the committee says it
cannot make a positive finding on the treaty to extend the
operation of Pine Gap for a further 10 years. The last time
this happened, the Australian Labour government was simply
dismissed by "friends of the US". This time, Labour is in the
opposition and issued a report saying the treaty should not be
extended until the committee is given the secret 1966 agreement
which established the base.
-  On 28 October, the federal government annnounced the biggest
shake-up in years in the administration of its defence
intelligence apparatus, to meet what it says is the growing and
more complex world of spying. The Defence Minister, Mr. Moore,
said a Defence Intelligence Board would be created to oversee
"the provision of better intelligence" to the government by the
three defence intelligence agencies.
  ...(cut)...

*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
   int-free Mailing List

  NY Transfer News Collective   *   A Service of Blythe Systems 
           Since 1985 - Information for the Rest of Us          
              339 Lafayette St., New York, NY 10012             
  http://www.blythe.org/                  e-mail: nyt@blythe.org 

nytcov-11.13.99-03:54:05-18637


Google Home - Advertising Programmes - About Google

2004 Google
1